Ivanka Trump, front left, U.S. President Donald Trump's daughter and Kim Yong Chol, vice chairman of North Korea's ruling Workers' Party Central Committee, second right, watch the closing ceremony of the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea, Sunday, Feb. 25, 2018.

Credit: Natacha Pisarenko/AP

Sennott: The Olympics Probably Hasn't Changed Relations With North Korea

February 26, 2018

The presence of Kim Jong Un’s sister at the Olympics and the unified Korean team signaled to many analysts the possible beginning of the end of the icy relationship between North and South Korea.

But with the medals doled out and the closing ceremonies wrapped up, news analyst Charlie Sennott said he isn’t so optimistic about the games’ effects on North Korea's relationship with the United States.

“I’m not sure that we give some glowing grade for a breakthrough here,” Sennott said on BPR today. “The regime constantly gives this drumbeat of, ‘America is the enemy, America is the aggressor,’ and America right now, with the way Trump is talking about North Korea, is feeling very much like an aggressor.”

Sennott said he predicts more of the same when it comes to America’s stance on working with North Korea.

“I don’t see it moving it any differently than the old containment policy,” he said. “I don’t see it going anywhere great in the near term, and I see a return to the policy of slow statis containment, and hopefully not military action, because I think that would be disastrous.”

Charlie Sennott is a news analyst here at WGBH, where he also heads up the GroundTruth Project. To hear his interview in its entirety, click on the audio player above.

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