Credit: WGBH Greater Boston

WATCH: Mood Changing Brain Pulses

July 1, 2015

We're all pretty stressed out. There’s work, being stuck in traffic, bills, picking up the kids on time, tuition, traffic, bills. You get the picture.

As our schedules grow tighter and tighter, it’s more challenging to find time to decompress and re-energize. Well, a local startup wants to fix that with a new device that they claim will bring you instant calm or energy, all with a click of an app.

Go to any convenient store and pharmacy, and you’ll easily find a bevy of energy drinks and coffee drinks, and on the other end of that spectrum an abundance of sleep-aids or natural supplements that claim to “promote calm.” It’s a multi-billion dollar market, and one that speaks to our ongoing quest to feel better faster.

And that demand is behind the science of local startup Thync, which just came out with a device that claims to bring you calm and relaxation on demand.

Jamie Tyler is co-founder of Thync, a startup made up of a group of neuroscientists and engineers. They’ve developed the first wearable device that modulates your brain by information it receives from your smartphone.

We developed the first product that’s for healthy consumers that aims to help them shift in and out of mental states throughout the day,” said Tyler. “So we stream wave forms- they’re called “vibes” from an iPhone to this device. It works just above your right eyebrow. And we deliver low electrical pulses to nerves on your head and the back of the neck that feed into key arousal regions of the brain.”

The idea of pulsing electrical currents into your head sounds a little freaky, but I said why not.

Sumon Pal designed this product, thus meriting the appropriate work title, Chief of Vibes.

I fiddled with the settings until I felt pressure on my forehead. When it gets to a slightly uncomfortable point, that’s when I’m supposed to take it down a notch to a more comfortable setting.

As Sumon continues to talk, I find myself having a hard time holding a conversation.

I’ve never conducted an interview feeling this groovy. I feel like I am under the influence of groovy. 


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